Genre: Dystopian


Mar 20
A Beginning at the End by Mike Chen: A Little Light Pandemic Reading, Anyone?

A Beginning at the End by Mike Chen: A Little Light Pandemic Reading, Anyone?

Reviews 26 ★★★★★

I don’t review many adult books on the blog anymore, but I couldn’t resist spreading the word about this one. Just read the synopsis and you’ll see why this is either a perfect read for these times or an absolutely horrible one—depending on your personality. If you’re like me, and you’re more than a little fascinated by all things pandemic and can’t get enough, you should read this book immediately. However, if you get stressed out by the mere thought of the damage a worldwide pandemic might do, you might want to skip this one (or at least wait to read it until the worst of COVID-19 has passed). I actually started listening to this book at the end of January, not knowing that talk of an actual pandemic was right around the corner. By the time I got to the end of the book (I listen in the car,… Read more »


Dec 06
Thunderhead and The Toll: More Proof that Neal Shusterman is Genius

Thunderhead and The Toll: More Proof that Neal Shusterman is Genius

Reviews 22 ★★★★★

If you’ve been around my blog for a while, you know that the Unwind Series is my absolute favorite series of all time. Neal Shusterman always manages to write books that are both exciting and philosophical—a difficult feat. Well, this latest series is no exception. I’ve already reviewed Scythe, so click the link to read what I had to say about the book (spoiler alert—I thought it was incredible with a small reservation about the way that the Scythes go about the business of killing). But, strangely I hadn’t read Thunderhead yet, despite my deep love for Scythe, so I’m going to start with a quick review of that one… Thunderhead was even better than Scythe (in my opinion) because it was less about the ways that the Scythes gleaned (though there were still some really interesting gleaning discussions—especially when it came to the way that Anastasia chose to do it)… Read more »


Aug 23
Bite-Sized Reviews of The Lady Rogue, The Silence Between Us, The Kingdom, and Sorry for Your Loss

Bite-Sized Reviews of The Lady Rogue, The Silence Between Us, The Kingdom, and Sorry for Your Loss

Reviews 20 ★★★½

I’ve got four reviews for you today: a YA historical fantasy, a YA sci fi, and two YA  contemps. I hope these bite-sized reviews will be enough to feed your fiction addiction! If you’re a fan of historical fiction with a gothic feel and a paranormal twist, this book will make your heart happy. The story follows Theodora as she travels across 1930’s Romania with her ex (who she has no closure with) in order to save her father from a mysterious group of people who want to get their hands on Vlad the Impaler’s evil magical ring. Theodora is plucky and intelligent—a woman who holds her own in a man’s world. The romantic tension between her and Huck is palpable, which I loved. I did wish the magical elements had been a bit more pronounced throughout the book, but that’s just my personal preference. Things took a definitively supernatural turn… Read more »


Apr 12
Ignite by Danielle Rogland: Review of a Character-centric Dystopian

Ignite by Danielle Rogland: Review of a Character-centric Dystopian

Reviews 24 ★★★½

Ignite is a fast-paced dystopian that doesn’t skimp on character. The story follows The Flames, a group of rebels who fights against the oppression of their brutal dictator and then leaves behind a burning candle to show that it’s members were there. Throughout the book, secrets are unraveled and the bonds of friendship (the kind that feels like family) are threatened—and possibly even broken. What Fed My Addiction: Strong characters. Without a doubt, the characters are what drew me into this book. The story is told from four POV’s and I connected to each and every one of them. First we have Jacks, an orphaned girl who’s been surviving on her own as a pickpocket since her “gang” was captured (and presumably killed). She’s the type of person who’s used to standing on the sidelines and keeping herself safe whenever possible, so it’s difficult for her to come to terms with her role… Read more »


Feb 22
Bite-Sized Reviews of The Impossible Fortress, Revenge of the Evil Librarian, Liberation, and The Anatomical Shape of a Heart

Bite-Sized Reviews of The Impossible Fortress, Revenge of the Evil Librarian, Liberation, and The Anatomical Shape of a Heart

Reviews 8

Lately I feel like I’ll never catch up with reviews. I might have to do another installment of bite-sized reviews sooner rather than later because I want to let you guys know my thoughts on all the fantastic books I’ve been reading lately! Hope these bite-sized reviews will be enough to feed your fiction addiction! This book was fun and kooky and nostalgic. Though I’ll admit that the often crude and horny teenage boys occasionally rubbed me the wrong way (this book definitely wasn’t trying to be PC), I do think that Rekulak captured the essence of these characters well and that they’re probably pretty more realistic than I’d like them to be. And I loved that, in the end, loyalty and friendship won out and Billy’s best friends rallied around him in ways I wasn’t expecting. I loved all of the nods to the 80s—from the references to TV… Read more »


Jan 31
Bite-Sized Reviews of RoseBlood, Frost and The Glittering Court

Bite-Sized Reviews of RoseBlood, Frost and The Glittering Court

Reviews 12

I have quite a few reviews I need to catch up on, so I thought I’d do another installment of bite-sized reviews and knock a few of them out. Hopefully these bite-sized reviews will be enough to feed your fiction addiction! I don’t know why, but I BARELY made it through this book. I just wasn’t engaged and nothing happened. Until the end of the book, literally almost nothing interesting (in my opinion) happened. It was all Thorn creepily watching Rune and Rune worrying about a boy she hurt with her magical opera voice. I nearly DNF’d at 50% but I was curious how it ended up, so I skim-read the second half, only reading carefully when something exciting happened. I did a lot of skim-reading. Lots of my friends enjoyed this book, so maybe it was just me? I simply couldn’t connect to it, though I will say that… Read more »


Nov 22
Scythe Review: AKA An Ode to Neal Shusterman

Scythe Review: AKA An Ode to Neal Shusterman

Reviews 26 ★★★★★

How has the entire world not recognized Neal Shusterman’s genius? Seriously, I am SO hoping that the Unwind movie comes out (I haven’t seen any news since May!!) and that it does the series justice because people need to talk about his books more. Scythe is one more example of Shusterman’s talent and imagination and his ability to shed light on humanity’s moral triumphs and shortcomings. Once again, he takes a look at a dystopian (utopian?) society—this time a society where humans have defeated death, pain, poverty, and every other earthly malady. The cloud has advanced into what the world terms the “Thunderhead.” It has amassed so much knowledge that it has been able to solve all of the world’s problems. All except one—with the defeat of death, overpopulation is a major issue. Even the Thunderhead can only figure out ways to support so many people. And up till this… Read more »


Sep 28
Bite-Sized Reviews: Metaltown and Stalking Jack the Ripper

Bite-Sized Reviews: Metaltown and Stalking Jack the Ripper

Reviews 8 ★★★½

There are so many late-September releases that I’m resorting to bite-sized reviews for some of them. Hopefully these bite-sized reviews will be enough to feed your fiction addiction! Metaltown by Kristen Simmons Published by Tor Teen on 9/20/16 Genres: Young Adult, Dystopian Pages: 380 Source: BEA My content rating: YA (Nothing more than kissing, Some violence) My rating: Metaltown, where factories rule, food is scarce, and hope is in short supply. The rules of Metaltown are simple: Work hard, keep your head down, and watch your back. You look out for number one, and no one knows that better than Ty. She’s been surviving on the factory line as long as she can remember. But now Ty has Colin. She’s no longer alone; it’s the two of them against the world. That’s something even a town this brutal can’t take away from her. Until it does. Lena’s future depends on her family’s factory, a beast that… Read more »


Jul 16
Bite-Sized Reviews – Truly Madly Guilty, Rebel of the Sands, Ready Player One

Bite-Sized Reviews – Truly Madly Guilty, Rebel of the Sands, Ready Player One

Reviews 15 ★★★★

A few quick reviews of some of the books I’ve read this summer. Hopefully these bite-sized reviews will be enough to feed your fiction addiction! Truly Madly Guilty by Liane Moriarty Published by Flatiron Books in 6/26/16 Genres: Adult, Contemporary Pages: 432 Source: BEA My content rating: Talk of sex, but nothing more My rating: Six responsible adults. Three cute kids. One small dog. It’s just a normal weekend. What could possibly go wrong? Sam and Clementine have a wonderful, albeit, busy life: they have two little girls, Sam has just started a new dream job, and Clementine, a cellist, is busy preparing for the audition of a lifetime. If there’s anything they can count on, it’s each other. Clementine and Erika are each other’s oldest friends. A single look between them can convey an entire conversation. But theirs is a complicated relationship, so when Erika mentions a last minute invitation to a barbecue with her neighbors, Tiffany… Read more »


Jun 27
This Savage Song by Victoria Schwab – 5 Star Review!

This Savage Song by Victoria Schwab – 5 Star Review!

All-Time Favorites, Reviews 21 ★★★★★

Wow! Just … wow! I haven’t read Schwab before, and now I know what I’ve been missing. I absolutely loved this story of humanity’s worst ills come to life in the form of monsters. What Fed My Addiction: Monstrous! This book gives us a bleak (but oh so fascinating) look at the human condition. In Schwab’s fantasy world, the urban areas have been overtaken by monsters that are born out of violence. Whenever a violent act is committed, a monster is born, creatures that can tear a human apart or suck their blood. But in the case of a truly horrific violent event – something along the lines of a mass murder – the monsters born can kill with a song. (This is the type of monster that August is.) But the way humanity responds to these monsters is just as compelling – as is so often the case with pain… Read more »