Series: Rosemarked


Nov 10
Bite-Sized Reviews of Umbertouched, Meet the Sky, Furyborn, and Reclaiming Shilo Snow

Bite-Sized Reviews of Umbertouched, Meet the Sky, Furyborn, and Reclaiming Shilo Snow

Reviews 10 ★★★★

I’ve got four YA reviews for you today, two fantasy, one sci-fi and a contemporary. I hope these bite-sized reviews will be enough to feed your fiction addiction! This book is the high-stakes conclusion to the Rosemarked non-magical fantasy duology. This second book in the duology felt very different from the first, mostly because it focuses on the aftermath of the choices that Zivah and Dineas made in book one and on the battles that ensue. My favorite part of this book was seeing Dineas deal with the repercussions of his dual life—he’s now an outsider to both his own people and the Amparans. He sees the Amparans as the enemy, but he also knows some of them as friends and he understands them in ways he hadn’t before. His own people look at him with distrust and sometimes outright hostility. His struggle to come to terms with these things… Read more »


Dec 07
Bite-Sized Reviews of Rosemarked, Turtles All the Way Down, My Name Is Jason. Mine Too, and When in Rome

Bite-Sized Reviews of Rosemarked, Turtles All the Way Down, My Name Is Jason. Mine Too, and When in Rome

Reviews 16

I’ve got four bite-sized reviews today. It’s a bit of a mixed-bag—a YA contemp, a YA fantasy, a book of art and poetry, and an NA contemp. I used to try to combine things more logically, but then I had some reviews that I waited forever to write, which didn’t work out so well. Anyway. I hope these bite-sized reviews will be enough to feed your fiction addiction! First off, I want to point out that while this book is set in a fantasy world, there’s no actual magic involved. When the book starts, we learn that Zivah is testing to become a healer, and at first it seems like the potions might have magical properties—but really, they’re basically just medicines. The rose plague is just a plague—though a very interesting one since some people remain carriers even after they’ve seemingly beat the disease (and they eventually die from it… Read more »