Genre: Contemporary


Feb 17
Bite-Sized Reviews of The Belles, The Hazel Wood, The Ambrose Deception, The Altered History of Willow Sparks

Bite-Sized Reviews of The Belles, The Hazel Wood, The Ambrose Deception, The Altered History of Willow Sparks

Reviews 9 ★★★★

I’ve got four bite-sized reviews for you today: two YA new releases (one of them is an audiobook), a MG contemp and a YA graphic novel. I hope these bite-sized reviews will be enough to feed your fiction addiction! The central messages in this book are fabulous! The book highlights our images of beauty and how far we will go to attain them. This is a society that sees itself as “ugly,” so people will endure great pain (and spend tons of money) in order to “fix” themselves. This is such an interesting commentary on our world, and not that far off from the truth. How many people will go to great extents to achieve a certain standard of beauty? We’re sort of obsessed. Camellia’s personal desire to be the Favorite (an official title of the Belle that works for the royal family) leads to a break in her relationship… Read more »


Feb 02
American Panda by Gloria Chao: Authentic and Moving

American Panda by Gloria Chao: Authentic and Moving

Reviews 16 ★★★★½

American Panda is a truly authentic exploration of the cultural clash that happens for many young Asian Americans whose parents hold tight to their roots. The book is obviously deeply personal, and it resonates with the reader because of that. What Fed My Addiction: Cultural ties. As I said in my intro, this book presents the issue of growing up in America, surrounded by American culture and values, and how that can be difficult with first-generation parents who were raised with a completely different set of values and cultural mores. Mei has always been a “good girl.” She has tried hard to please her parents, and she sees the value in their deeply seeded Taiwanese culture. At the same time, she struggles to find herself when her parents’ expectations start to clash with her own wants and needs. She has to decide if she will live for her parents or live for herself—a… Read more »


Jan 22
Say You’ll Remember Me by Katie McGarry: Review & Giveaway

Say You’ll Remember Me by Katie McGarry: Review & Giveaway

Giveaways (Ended), Reviews 44 ★★★★½

Say You’ll Remember Me is just what I’ve come to expect to Katie McGarry. It’s the type of contemporary that makes me laugh and makes me cry and leaves me truly thinking about all the complexities of the themes. These are my favorite types of contemporaries! What Fed My Addiction: Elle’s Complex family dynamics. Elle’s family life is complicated, to say the least. But I love that McGarry doesn’t give us straight-up villainous, controlling parents. At so many points through the book, they show that they truly care about Elle and think that they’re looking out for her best interests. They pressure her into a lot of things, but they really do try to give her a choice, at least from their perspective—they sit down with her and talk to her about her role on the campaign and ask if she’s okay with it. It’s not that they don’t give her a… Read more »


Jan 08
Bite-Sized Reviews of Love, Life, and the List, The Young Queens, Seriously Wicked and The Wolves of Mercy Falls Series

Bite-Sized Reviews of Love, Life, and the List, The Young Queens, Seriously Wicked and The Wolves of Mercy Falls Series

Reviews 38

I’ve got four bite-sized reviews of YA books today. Three books and a series! I hope these bite-sized reviews will be enough to feed your fiction addiction! This book is SO Kasie West (which is a very good thing, trust me). First off, I pretty much always love stories that involve best friends becoming more—I’m a complete sucker for that trope. But this book is a lot more than the romance. Abby is a pretty typical seventeen-year-old—she thinks she has her life pretty much figured out in a lot of ways but then something happens that shakes her belief in herself and her insecurities come rushing in. I’m sure that a lot of YA readers will be able to relate to this. Family ties are incredibly important in the story. Abby’s relationship with her mom (who struggles with agoraphobia) and her dad (who is stationed overseas, but we still get to see him via email… Read more »


Dec 11
The Sky Is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson: A Dual Review with Danielle Hammelef

The Sky Is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson: A Dual Review with Danielle Hammelef

Dual Reviews, Reviews 14

(No actual dueling—or even arm-twisting—was involved. Don’t worry, this is a dual review, not a duel review. Sorry if you’re disappointed.) Today I have another dual review of a book from my Make Me Read It Giveaway (as part of the Wrap-Up Round-Up). Danielle Hammelef, a faithful FYFA reader, was the latest winner, and she chose to make me read The Sky Is Everywhere. Once I read the book, I sent italong to her. Once again, Danielle took me up on the option of doing a dual review, which I was really excited about since it’s such a fun way to review! Read on to see what we thought of the book… NICOLE SAYS: I have to confess that, overall, this book just wasn’t for me. I LOVED Nelson’s I’ll Give You the Sun, so I had high expectations, but this book just sort of frustrated me. And the more I thought… Read more »


Dec 07
Bite-Sized Reviews of Rosemarked, Turtles All the Way Down, My Name Is Jason. Mine Too, and When in Rome

Bite-Sized Reviews of Rosemarked, Turtles All the Way Down, My Name Is Jason. Mine Too, and When in Rome

Reviews 16

I’ve got four bite-sized reviews today. It’s a bit of a mixed-bag—a YA contemp, a YA fantasy, a book of art and poetry, and an NA contemp. I used to try to combine things more logically, but then I had some reviews that I waited forever to write, which didn’t work out so well. Anyway. I hope these bite-sized reviews will be enough to feed your fiction addiction! First off, I want to point out that while this book is set in a fantasy world, there’s no actual magic involved. When the book starts, we learn that Zivah is testing to become a healer, and at first it seems like the potions might have magical properties—but really, they’re basically just medicines. The rose plague is just a plague—though a very interesting one since some people remain carriers even after they’ve seemingly beat the disease (and they eventually die from it… Read more »


Nov 18
Bite-Sized Reviews of The November Girl, Haven, and The Magic Misfits

Bite-Sized Reviews of The November Girl, Haven, and The Magic Misfits

Reviews 10

I’ve got three bite-sized reviews today. Two YA and a MG. My mom did the review of November Girl for me. (I plan to read it too since she really enjoyed it, but I’m swamped right now.) I hope these bite-sized reviews will be enough to feed your fiction addiction!     This is the story of Hector and Anda, an abused teenage half-Korean, half-black boy who feels he doesn’t fit in with the people around him and a mysterious girl who lives on Isle Royale year-round, even when everyone else leaves for the winter. First, let me say I was impressed with the way the author was able to draw my attention and make me interested in the story from the very beginning. I didn’t read the blurb before I read the book, so for me the story was more of a mystery than it would have been if I ‘d… Read more »


Nov 08
Dear Martin by Nic Stone – 5-Star Review & Giveaway

Dear Martin by Nic Stone – 5-Star Review & Giveaway

Giveaways (Ended), Reviews 20 ★★★★★

This little book packs a powerful punch.  What Fed My Addiction: Perspective. The book is told from Justyce’s POV. He’s a black teenager living in a mostly white world (he goes to a boarding school) near the home he grew up in, which is in a black neighborhood. So the lens that he sees the world through is unique. He is relatable to many people—he can often see both sides of the story, which helps us to do so too. The struggle of identity. Of course, because of Justyce’s position, he has a hard time feeling at home anywhere. He can’t go back to being the kid he was in the neighborhood he grew up in, but he also doesn’t always feel like he fits at school. After a traumatic event where he’s treated unfairly, he starts to see things at school that he’d been blind to before. He suddenly can’t turn… Read more »


Nov 06
Bite-Sized Reviews of Now Is Everything, The First Kiss Hypothesis, Frost Like Night, The Raven Cycle Series and November 9

Bite-Sized Reviews of Now Is Everything, The First Kiss Hypothesis, Frost Like Night, The Raven Cycle Series and November 9

Reviews 22

I’ve got five bite-sized reviews today. Most of these are YA, but the last one is New Adult. I thought about trying to split these up, but I don’t read enough NA lately to warrant a full set of bite-sized reviews, and I just decided to go ahead and put it with these YA reads. I hope these bite-sized reviews will be enough to feed your fiction addiction! So, I picked up this book on a total whim. I was glancing through Twitter and saw this adorable pic that the author’s daughter had drawn telling people to read her mom’s book. Since I’m a sucker for that sort of thing, I immediately headed over to Goodreads to check it out, and it sounded like the type of book I’d love! I headed over to Edelweiss, downloaded it and immediately started reading! (See, I wasn’t kidding when I said it was… Read more »


Nov 01
Team BFF: Race to the Finish by Stacia Deutsch & other Girls Who Code Books

Team BFF: Race to the Finish by Stacia Deutsch & other Girls Who Code Books

Middle Grade, Reviews 12

Today I’m featuring the Girls Who Code books on Feed Your Fiction Addiction. These books are aimed at middle school girls and encourage them to think about coding and technology in a new way. Since 2012, Girls Who Code has taught computing skills to and inspired over 10,000 girls across America–and they’re just at the beginning of their mission to close the gender gap in tech. There are two fiction books that follow a diverse group of girls learning to code, a nonfiction book that’s described as “Part how-to, part inspiration, and all fun,” and a coding journal of sorts where girls can find ideas for coding and learn to use the things they love as inspiration for coding. The second fiction book and the journal were both published yesterday, so I’m going to focus on those, but my 13-year-old daughter and I also read the first fiction book (The Friendship Code), so I’m going to talk about… Read more »